Feb
13th

February Board Meeting

February 13th, 2018

Mar
13th

March Board Meeting

March 13th, 2018

Apr
10th

April Board Meeting

April 10th, 2018

May
8th

May Board Meeting

May 8th, 2018

Jun
12th

June Board Meeting

June 12th, 2018

Jan
9th

January Board Meeting

January 9th, 2018

Dec
20th

December Special Board Meeting December 20, 2017

December 20th, 2017

Dec
12th

December Board Meeting

December 12th, 2017

Nov
13th

November Board Meeting

November 13th, 2017

Oct
17th

Special Board Meeting October 17,2017

October 17th, 2017

Oct
10th

October Board Meeting

October 10th, 2017

Sep
8th

September Board Meeting

September 8th, 2017

Aug
15th

USFWS Public Scoping Meeting

August 15th, 2017

Aug
14th

USFWS Public Scoping Meeting

August 14th, 2017

Aug
8th

August Board Meeting

August 8th, 2017

Jul
11th

July Board Meeting

July 11th, 2017

Jul
10th

Public Open House

July 10th, 2017

Jun
28th

Special Board Meeting

June 28th, 2017

Jun
14th

Community Information Meeting

June 14th, 2017

Jun
13th

June Board Meeting

June 13th, 2017

Jun
13th

Emergency Executive Board Meeting June

June 13th, 2017

May
9th

May Board Meeting

May 9th, 2017

Apr
11th

April Board Meeting

April 11th, 2017

Mar
21st

March Special Board Meeting

March 21st, 2017

Mar
14th

March Board Meeting

March 14th, 2017

Change can not only be difficult to implement - but at times - challenging to grasp & accept. Modernization of our canal systems is no exception. Yet, change & various upgrades have been implemented since the early 1900's to imporove our canal system. Wooden flumes were replaced by steel pipes, and mechanical cleaners added to intake screens. In 1938 COID, Crook County Improvement (Lone Pine) District and the Arnold Irrigation District formed a cooperative effort with the federal government to construct a dam at Crane Prairie for winter water storage. http://bit.ly/2lvJWKhRead more

We are excited to get this conservation project started!Read more

Do you have questions about your winter stock run schedule? Check out this page of COID's website for answers: http://coid.org/important-information/Read more

Winter is upon us! You may remember last November, that in an effort to raise flows this winter in the #DeschutesRiver, the DBBC took steps to ensure that #DeschutesRiver flows below Wickiup Dam are not less than 175 cubic feet per second through March 2018. In what ways would these efforts help to sustain wildlife through this winter? Full article here: http://bit.ly/2CjJru3Read more

What is the scope of our mission? More than 700 miles of canals provide agricultural and industrial water to the Terrebonne, Redmond, Bend, Alfalfa and Powell Butte areas. In addition, COID provides water to the City of Redmond and numerous subdivisions; #inBend, many parks and schools receive water through the COID system. We love where we live, and we will continue to provide reliable and efficient delivery of water to our patrons in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner, with courtesy and integrity. http://bit.ly/2lvJWKhRead more

Snowpack Update: It’s pretty bleak right now, but this can change a lot if we get some good spring and mid-late winter storms. Let it snow!Read more

While enjoying the serenity of Mirror Pond as you stroll through Bend's Drake Park, you may or may not be thinking about the years-long debate over this iconic feature of #DowntownBend. What topics make up the opposing sides of this river issue? Essentially, weighing human "wants" and the river's "needs" - but there's much more. Read the entire article here: http://bit.ly/2BXyURKRead more

While our System Improvement Plan (SIP) is a valuable tool, it is just one of many steps we need to take in the future. For example, we will soon turn our sights to identifying "on-farm conservation" measures and additional fish & wildlife actions, and all of these steps take time. We strive to maintain our high level of committment to working with our partners on solutions that benefit #farms, #fish and families in the Deschutes Basin! http://bit.ly/2ttR5xYRead more

Wow, 2018 is here - marking our 100 year anniversary, serving our community! We are looking forward to working along with you this year, in accord with our mission, to provide water for the 45,000 acres within an 180,000 acre area here in #CentralOregon. We wish all of our patrons a #HappyNewYear! http://bit.ly/2lvJWKhRead more

Here at Central Oregon Irrigation District our mission statement is this: "provide reliable and efficient delivery of water to our patrons in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner with courtesy and integrity." Our century-long involvement to fulfill this mission in our #CentralOregon community will continue into the future as we actively support the conservation of all our natural resources. As 2017 winds to close, we thank you all for joining us in our support of this mission. http://bit.ly/2lvJWKhRead more

What are the benefits of irrigation modernization to #farmers? A few would be: protecting water from seepage or evaporation during delivery to #farms assures that farmers receive enough water in the right amount when they need it for their crops. This decreases the amount of water they've previously required. Transporting less water has financial benefits because it reduces operation & maintenance costs. About this plan: http://bit.ly/2u33jLdRead more

From all of us here at COID to you, wishing you all a Merry Christmas!Read more

Did you know - no new amounts of water are available in our Deschutes Basin? Surface water in #CentralOregon is a finite resource. The only way additional water will become available to COID’s subscribers is through conservation. Knowing what COID has done in the past to preserve and conserve water can instill confidence in its patrons regarding future conservation projects. Read about these projects on our website. http://bit.ly/2lvJWKhRead more

Hydropower - what is its role in the modernization of our local irrigation systems? Excess pressure created by gravity as irrigation water flows to its delivery point on-farm can be used to generate hydropower, with revenues from renewable electricity sales that help to finance the implementation of a modernization project. These so-called “in-conduit” #hydropower projects are built within irrigation systems where no fish are present and do not divert extra water beyond irrigation needs. Read about how the #SwalleyIrrigationDistrict Main Canal (SID) Piping and Hydroelectric Project permanently restored ~39 cfs to the Middle #Deschutes River. http://bit.ly/2itOEaURead more

The film “Sharing Waters,” targeted to middle school students about the importance of ‘sharing water’ in Central Oregon’s High Desert ecosystem. has been chosen as an official selection for the 16th annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival.Read more

Irrigation modernization brings up concerns over financing, and we get that. Why should public dollars be used for such a project? Supporting efforts to modernize outdated systems accelerates project completion as well as the associated benefits for the agriculture community, the environment, and society at large. With broad financial support, projects can be completed over a period of 3 to 5 years rather than the 20-30 years now typically required. http://bit.ly/2nQQCm7Read more

Spotlight on our local #SIP from Oregon Public Broadcasting- OPB: With Central Oregon’s booming population growth, water is an increasingly important resource. And on the Upper Deschutes River, scarce water has become a big problem for wildlife and river habitat. Piping the canals provides huge opportunities for the district to conserve water. The idea is that Central Oregon Irrigation District could then “give” some of that water they conserve to North Unit. That way, North Unit irrigators could put more water upstream back into the river for fish and frogs. Full article here: http://bit.ly/2BrgaNLRead more

Here at COID, every month employees contribute a little out of their paycheck to our “Barbara Fehl Dream Tree” program so we can help make a family’s #Christmas brighter! Each year we work with different organizations to adopt a family that may not be able to have Christmas. So, in the Christmas spirit, we provide a Christmas dinner and all the presents to make their Christmas a little brighter. This year we joined up with CASA who put us in contact with a single mom with 4 young kids. We were able to contact the family and find out the special items they were hoping Santa would bring. This is our own Janet Brown & Barbara Fehl spending and evening shopping and wrapping with the staff. We also drew 3 names off the Christmas tree at the Senior Center & were able to provide a few gifts for those seniors.Read more

Seriously, why all the talk about irrigation moderization? What's to modernize? Well, most of Oregon’s irrigation district canals were dug by hand during the late 1800s and the 1940s. So while water demands increase due to climate change and an increasing #CentralOregon population, we are attempting to use a 100 year old system to satisfy demands. Admittedly, these aged and failing systems have become operational liabilities in many instances. More here: http://bit.ly/2nQQCm7Read more

Despite the fact that water losses are occuring in open irrigation systems, a decade of studies have conclulded that there IS enough water in the #DeschutesBasin to meet the needs of #agriculture, cities and our rivers, if we undertake a series of steps, including the modernization of the irrigation districts. Have questions about this modernization plan? Read about it in detail. http://bit.ly/2m1rvgPRead more

​You'll want to put this amazing event on your 2018 calendar! The RiverFeast Dinner & Auction supports the restoration work of the #DeschutesRiverConservancy. Join us in 2018, the ​second Saturday in May for a delightful evening of irresistible food, spirits and music. Bid on exclusive adventures and experiences, custom art and other wonderful packages. ​Give back to our beautiful rivers while exploring the ​stunning event space at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon. Reserve now. http://bit.ly/295m3EhRead more

How do you modernize irrigation districts? It starts by replacing open canals with pipes which conserves water by eliminating seepage and evaporation. Irrigation canals use gravity to keep water flowing. Putting the water into a pipe pressurizes it, allowing irrigators to remove costly pumps, and enabling them to upgrade to more water-efficient irrigation systems on-farm. http://bit.ly/2m1rvgPRead more

We've been talking a lot about the upcoming conservation and piping projects on the horizon - and would like to open it up to you for questions. Let us know any questions you may have about these projects in the comments below!Read more

There are two main types of irrigation systems: gravity and pressurized irrigation. Gravity irrigation uses the force of gravity to distribute water across a field. Open ditches or pipe systems along with siphon tubes, ditch gates, pipe valves or orifices deliver the water to the field. In contrast, a pressurized irrigation system delivers water to the field under pressure in lateral, hand-move, and center-pivot pipe systems with attached sprinklers. The latter is what COID is working towards to ultimately preserve our precious water resource. Read about it: http://bit.ly/2itKIqsRead more

*1000 homes are powered by 1 MW of hydroelectricity